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Effort to save the Hunt House still seeks financial benefactor
by Neill Calabro
Jun 20, 2013 | 1421 views | 0 0 comments | 58 58 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Aubrey Newby gives his kids a tour of the site in fear that it will be their generation’s only chance to see the structure.
Aubrey Newby gives his kids a tour of the site in fear that it will be their generation’s only chance to see the structure.
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As he drove toward the Jones County home in Round Oak, he was soon to meet with the man who may be the very last owner of the famed Elmcroft Plantation home.

And as Aubrey Newby approached the Hunt House, in the back of his mind he was thinking it was a good thing he saw no smoke rising over the roof tops. Of course, he didn’t actually expect a bonfire blazing down Otis Redding Road, with the 203-year-old house being hacked up and made into kindling, but it’s just another thought amongst many as Newby tries to get a bit more into the thick of the struggle.

His passion has long been to save this house, going back to a story in The Jones County News by James Newberry in 2007. And though six years have gone by and rumors run rampant of destruction, his hopes yet remain high that a miracle will save Jones County’s most untouched Civil War relic.

This relic is one so compelling that he took time out of his week to bring his children for what may be their generation’s last look. The history for our future is of most importance to Newby, and he will continue with his love of preservation regardless of the outcome.

For the full story, pick up a copy of this week's newspaper or subscribe to our e-Edition at http://ee.jcnews.com.
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